• Posts Tagged ‘timsgarry’

    Before the Dingwall Sheriff

    by  • 14 March 2011 • Life in Uig, Military & Police • 0 Comments

    George Gillies, residing at Grista [Erista], and John Maclean, residing at Fimisgarry [Timsgarry], in the parish of Uig and Island of Lewis, accused of having broken into the parish church of Uig, and stolen therefrom a waterproof coat, some carpenters’ tools, and a pane of glass, pleaded not guilty.

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    Uig Farms, 1844-1888

    by  • 1 August 2010 •  • 0 Comments

    From a statement lodged with the Crofters Commission by the Estate management in November 1888, showing alterations made over farms in Lewis, with the occupancy and rent of each during the period 1844-1888. Mealista, Keannhusly and Island Mealista 1844-49 Alex and John MacRae £80.0.0 1850 do. £105.0.0 1860 do. £120.0.0 1870 John Mitchell £130.0.0 1886-87 [...]

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    A Church in Trinidad

    by  • 29 November 2010 • Church, Emigration, Featured Notes • 3 Comments

    Colin Ian Maclean (Cailean Ruaraidh Phadraig) was born in 1927 in Crowlista and brought up at 8 Timsgarry. He was minister of the Church of Scotland charge of Trinidad, Port of Spain: Greyfriars and St Ann’s at the time of the laying of this foundation stone for this new building at Arouca.

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    Fishing Boats in Uig

    by  • 11 March 2010 • Fishing, History, Transport • 0 Comments

    [singlepic=637,,386] Many thanks to Donald J Macleod of Enaclete and Bridge of Don for his research into the fishing boats of Uig. He adds that these boats used lines and not trawls to catch white fish. It was the end of March and beginning of April that was known as the ‘Hungry month’ in Gaelic [...]

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    Hogmanay in the Capital, 1943

    by  • 1 January 2010 • Entertainments, WWII • 1 Comment

    The pressmen get their snaps – Lewisfolk provide a little colour Stornoway Gazette, 21 Jan 1944 American press photographers visited the vicinity of St Pauls on Hogmanay to pick up a few colourful pictures of New Year celebrations in London. A group of Lewisfolk gave them their best ‘shots’ of the evening when Pipers Findlater [...]

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    Timsgarry | Timisgearraidh

    by  • 22 July 2010 •  • 0 Comments

    A village of 8 crofts in the central part of West Uig, overlooking Uig Sands. It adjoins the old (and now deserted) township of Erista and the church and glebe lands at Baile na Cille. It was cleared to extend the Glebe in the 1820s and also to create a farm: the farmhouse was Taigh [...]

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    Crowlista School 1937

    by  • 28 February 2009 • Archive photos, Education • 0 Comments

    Thanks to Roddy Maclean for the scans and Donald Maciver for the names.  Those marked * are still living in 2009. Back Row: 1. Alexander Macleod Crowlista 2. *Malcolm J Macleod 8 Aird 3. John A Maciver 10 Crowlista (later 8 Crowlista) 4. Angus J Macleod 2 Timsgarry 5. John M Macdonald 6 Crowlista 6. [...]

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    Prosperity and Overcrowding in Uig, 1850s-1890s

    by  • 17 February 2009 • Crofting, Fishing, History, Land Issues • 0 Comments

    From Uig, A Hebridean Parish, by HA Moisley and the Geographical Field Group, 1960. The crofting population of Uig started the second half of the nineteenth century with far less land than had been occupied by their forebears fifty years before, and, although famine, clearance and emigration had slightly reduced the population between 1841 and [...]

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    Crowlista School c1952

    by  • 10 September 2008 • Archive photos, Education • 0 Comments

    [singlepic=199,500,333] Teacher:  Mrs Catherine Finlayson, Ardroil Back:  Donald Maciver 8 Crowlista Catherine Ann Macfarlane Balnacille Manse Rachael Mackay 4 Timsgarry Peter M Matheson 24 Crowlista Front: Agnes Macfarlane Bailenacille Manse Jessie Matheson 24 Crowlista Alex M Matheson 24 Crowlista Anna Finlayson 1 Ardroil Dinah Macfarlane Bailenacille Manse. Share

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    Rev David Watson’s Boundary Dispute

    by  • 25 August 2008 • Church, History, Land Issues • 0 Comments

    David Watson was ordained as minister of Uig in 1845 but as the congregation had mostly migrated to the Free Church, his Church remained largely empty. He was at odds with the people and the estate, as the following notes in the 1851 diary (published by Acair) of the Chamberlain John Munro Mackenzie attest: Thursday [...]

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    Seonnaidh Mòr on the Subject of Milk

    by  • 11 August 2008 • Health & Food, History • 0 Comments

    The Dewar Commission, charged with investigating the state of medical provision in the Highlands and Islands, interviewed, amongst others, John Macrae (Seonnaidh Mòr), the farmer at Timsgarry, on 12 October 1912 at Garynahine.  The questions are put by the chairman, Sir John Dewar MP. You have three nurses in the parish, and the nuring is [...]

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    Long an Iaruinn: the Ship of Iron

    by  • 22 July 2008 • Tales & Traditions • 0 Comments

    Dolly Doctor, in Tales and Traditions, tells of the wreck of a ship at Carnish in 1775. In the picture Sgeir an Iaruinn is the small island in the middle of the picture, with Shielibhig in the distance on the far left. All night the people round Uig Bay had listened to the cries of woe [...]

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    Uig Shop: 1981 to 2008

    by  • 30 June 2008 • Life in Uig • 0 Comments

    Uig Community Shop has just opened a new extension; the picture shows the arrangements in August 1981, with Calum Ruadh at the manual pumps.  Thanks to Carol Wallis (waiting by the car) for the photo. Share

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    Taigh Sgoile Chiosamuil (1 Timsgarry)

    by  • 26 June 2008 • History • 0 Comments

    The house at 1 Timsgarry, the oldest whitehouse (taigh geal) in Uig, was originally Ciosamul Schoolhouse (Taigh Sgoile Chiosamuil), and one of the first teachers ca.1796 was John Macaskill, a relation of Janet Macaskill, wife of Rev Hugh Munro.  John later emigrated to Cape Breton. Subsequently it was Timsgarry Farmhouse, occupied by first Mitchells and then Macraes.  In [...]

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