• Vikings

    Replica Viking ship to be built in Norway

    by  • 1 March 2011 • Viking News, Vikings • 1 Comment

    Volunteers are aiming to complete and sail a full-scale replica of Norway’s famed Oseberg ship, one of the best-preserved and most celebrated Viking relics in the world, later this year. The original Oseberg ship can be found in Oslo’s Viking Ship Museum. Builders hope the replica can be used at sea later this year. Enthusiasts working [...]

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    Murchadh Ban

    by  • 22 August 2010 • Tales & Traditions, Vikings • 0 Comments

    This story comes from the end of the 18th century, but seems to hark back to an earlier time.  However it is likely that the Viking element was grafted on later – did Vikings pick up local pilots? And potatoes didn’t arrive in the islands until the middle of the 18th century, and even by [...]

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    The Chessmen Talk (not literally)

    by  • 8 March 2010 • Chessmen, History, News & Events, Vikings • 1 Comment

    [singlepic=1081,320,240,,left]Comann Eachdraidh Uig played host last week to a visit from two experts on the Lewis Chessman, who hit the headlines in November with their theories relocating the find-site to Mealista, rather than Ardroil. Dr David Caldwell, Keeper of Scotland and Europe at the National Museum of Scotland, and Dr Mark Hall, curator at Perth [...]

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    New Theories on the Uig Chessmen

    by  • 10 November 2009 • Chessmen, News & Events, Vikings • 0 Comments

    An article published in Mediaeval Archaeology this week raises some questions about the origins of the Uig Chessmen.  From the BBC today: New research has cast doubt on traditional theories about the historic Lewis Chessmen. The 93 pieces – currently split between museums in Edinburgh and London – were discovered on Lewis in 1831. But [...]

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    The King Earns his Keep

    by  • 22 February 2009 • Vikings • 0 Comments

    [singlepic id=1231 w=240 float=left] Look who’s on the front of the German edition of Bernard Cornwell’s The Lords of the North. It’s always a bit of shock to see our friends out and about. It’s described as “a powerful story of betrayal, romance and struggle, set in an England of turmoil, upheaval and glory. Uhtred, [...]

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    Why You Should Never Laugh at a Berserker

    by  • 8 February 2009 • Archaeology, Chessmen, Vikings • 0 Comments

    The definitive short guide to our Uig Chessmen, found in Ardroil in 1831, is The Lewis Chessmen, by James Robinson of the British Museum, which addresses aspects of their discovery, design and likely provenance, and also the history of chess.  Of our little family of courtly Vikings, the berserkers are the most intriguing.  From the [...]

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    Talk: Dr Mary Macleod on Vikings, Fri 30 Jan

    by  • 27 January 2009 • News & Events, Vikings • 0 Comments

    Dr Mary Macleod, the council archaeologist, will give an illustrated talk in Uig this week on Viking settlement in Scotland with particular reference to the Western Isles, and will also touch on the recently-discovered prehistoric graves on Traigh na Berie, which were excavated last week. Uig Hall, 7.30pm, Friday 30 January.  All welcome; tea served; [...]

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    Prehistoric Graves Found in Uig

    by  • 24 January 2009 • Archaeology, Vikings, Weather • 0 Comments

    [singlepic=424,366] Susan and Keith Stringer came across evidence of a grave in the dunes above Traigh na Berie, which on excavation was found to contain a crouch burial (in the picture, in the trench at the foot of the stick). From Hebrides News: A human skeleton thought to be 4000 years old has been discovered [...]

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    Hnefatafl

    by  • 11 August 2008 • Chessmen, History, Vikings • 0 Comments

    Hnefatafl, or the King’s Table, was played in Northern Europe in the Dark Ages, and popular in Viking lands from about 400AD.  Different versions were developed and sets and boards have been found from Ireland to the Ukraine.  We’re not aware of any proof that it was played in Uig, but it seems inevitable that [...]

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