• Uig in Old Norse

    by  • 18 January 2012 • Placenames, Vikings • 5 Comments

    Enormous thanks to Angus Macdonald for this splendid map of Uig, with Norse place names (made by himself). Click to zoom below or see it here.

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    5 Responses to Uig in Old Norse

    1. Angus Macdonald
      10 February 2012 at 8:21 pm

      Although most names can be traced back to a generally geographical interpretation some are very much open for interpretation. Also rather like Blackadder enlightening Dr Johnson with his diary there are many that are not on the map – a very interesting one being the root of Geodha Sgoilte which probably comes from Gja Skildr or a chasm surrounded by shields – This is thought to be the same root from which the name St Kilda comes. What better reason can there be for setting up a world heritage visitor centre at that stunning location!

    2. k.kerr74@hotmail.co.uk
      17 July 2012 at 11:42 am

      Dear Angus, I think your map of Uig with Norse names is wonderful! Do you have any copies for sale-I would LOVE to have one
      Best wishes, Kate

    3. Robyn Campbell
      17 January 2013 at 9:15 am

      Yes Dear Angus, please make copies of your norse map available. I have just traced my family tree back to Uig. It is very exciting. Tks Robyn

    4. Angus Macdonald
      3 February 2014 at 9:04 pm

      Robyn, apologies I’ve only just seen your comment a year late! You can get in touch by e mail gussymac1@hotmail.com. Thanks.

    5. Carol Trester
      20 April 2018 at 9:22 pm

      Most interested in any Parish Uig “Macaulay” or “MacAulay” DNA projects. Seems my ancestors of Malcolm MacAulay and Johanna MacPhee; left Parish Uig either late 1700s or early 1800s sailing with MacLeods to either Cape Breton or Pictou County, Nova Scotia, Canada. Land records document they already owned several acres and had well established generations of family to support by their successful lumber businesses in both Pictou County and Cape Breton, Nova Scotia by 1841

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